Oliver Art Center: glimpses

Friday and Saturday, July 28 & 29, Oliver Art Center gallery buzzed with activity as nine Chelsea area artists revealed their latest works for the installation “Bugs, Birds and Beasts.” The show runs through 8 September 2017.Read more

Swarm: Entomology 101

What could be more fun than a swirling cloud of large, hairy insects hanging about in your living space? An eclectic mix of spiders, mosquitoes, beetles and flies—a budding entomologist’s dream! Each insect in this swarm has its own fascinating story, described in the slides below. The piece will be for sale and can be seen in person at Oliver Art Center, 28 July – 8 September 2017. Cold assembly: found objects, recycled jewelry, wire, fasteners, chandelier crystals, vintage cabinet knobs, acetate,Read more

Eupatorus gracilicornis: Wilburn

The Five-horned Beetle is one of the most elegant of rhinoceros beetles. They are also known as Hercules beetles, unicorn beetles, or horn beetles. There are over 300 described species of these beetles, best known for their bizarre shapes and large size. Wilburn will be on display and for sale at the Oliver Center for the Arts July 28 – September 8, 2017 as part of a group exhibition, “Bugs, Birds and Beasts.” Cold assembly: vintage wood sock darner, antique drawer pulls,Read more

Panchlora nivea: Virgil

 The Cuban cockroach is found in the Caribbean and southern U.S. It lives outdoors, so is not considered a pest. In fact it is a popular pet roach due to its relatively pleasant green color, and because it is not an invasive indoor species. It is also used as food for other pets. Virgil is formidably tall–just over four feet–but manages to charm folks with his dry wit and delicate sensibilities. He will be on display and for sale at the Oliver CenterRead more

Archimantis latistyla: Brunneis

Brunneis is based on the large brown mantis, a species native to Australia. They are beneficial garden insects who prey on pests. Adults can jump about a meter and attack large prey, such as small birds, frogs, and lizards. While a praying mantis will bite if provoked, the bite is not venomous. Brunneis will be on display and for sale at the Oliver Center for the Arts July 28 – September 8, 2017 as part of a group exhibition, “Bugs, Birds andRead more

Anisoptera L. libellulidae: Rufus

Rufus represents >1000 species with nearly worldwide distribution. Because of their coloration and behavior, they are one of the most easily identifiable of dragonflies. They perch often on shrubs, or flowers, especially near lakes or ponds, and habitually return to the same perch. Rufuswill be on display and for sale at the Oliver Center for the Arts July 28 – September 8, 2017 as part of a group exhibition, “Bugs, Birds and Beasts.” Cold assembly: Antique wooden spindle, vintage buttons, wire, acetate,Read more

Anisoptera A. aeshnidae: Parva Draco

Parva represents the family of darners, among the largest dragonflies on Earth. With their four large and powerful wings, they can fly forward or backward or hover like a helicopter. Their large, hemispherical compound eyes promote excellent vision, and they are voracious insect predators with sharp, biting mouthparts. Parva will be on display and for sale at the Oliver Center for the Arts July 28 – September 8, 2017 as part of a group exhibition, “Bugs, Birds and Beasts.” Cold assembly: antiqueRead more

Missulena occatoria: Rubrum

Rubrum references a male Red-headed Mouse Spider, found in mainland Australia. They mainly prey on insects but also on frogs and lizards. During mating season, males wander around during the day in search of a willing female. On finding her, the male taps the ground at her burrow, hoping for a warm reception. Rubrum will be on display and for sale at the Oliver Center for the Arts July 28 – September 8, 2017 as part of a group exhibition, “Bugs, BirdsRead more