Mass Ratios and Insect Respect.

A fun re-post from my drawing blog. How many living insects exist in the world on any given day? Scientists estimate somewhere between 1 quintillion (that’s a billion billion) and 10 quintillion (10,000,000,000,000,000,000). With merely 6.8 billion humans on Earth, it seems we’re outnumbered. 

If you’re like me, you’re having trouble visualizing the those numbers in terms of biomass. As luck would have it, the mathematical heavy lifting has been done, which makes the case for roughly 200 pounds of insects for each pound of human.Read more

Rarely seen: the Luna Moth

Before constructing an insect sculpture, I do a little research and then make drawings (as above), which I can refer to while working. I haven’t yet created a sculpture of this insect, but it’s in the lineup for this summer. The luna moth (Actias luna) is a Saturniid moth, found almost exclusively in North America, where it enjoys its status as one of that region’s largest moths (its wingspan measures up to 114 mm or 4.5”). Following many weeks inRead more

Oliver Art Center: glimpses

Friday and Saturday, July 28 & 29, Oliver Art Center gallery buzzed with activity as nine Chelsea area artists revealed their latest works for the installation “Bugs, Birds and Beasts.” The show runs through 8 September 2017.Read more

Swarm: Entomology 101

What could be more fun than a swirling cloud of large, hairy insects hanging about in your living space? An eclectic mix of spiders, mosquitoes, beetles and flies—a budding entomologist’s dream! Each insect in this swarm has its own fascinating story, described in the slides below. The piece will be for sale and can be seen in person at Oliver Art Center, 28 July – 8 September 2017. Cold assembly: found objects, recycled jewelry, wire, fasteners, chandelier crystals, vintage cabinet knobs, acetate,Read more

wear an arachnid

I was thinking about how cool it might be to wear a spider. So I fashioned an ever so lovely pendant from a vintage button, found jewelry, wire and wool. If you’re attending the opening of the Oliver Art Center’s “Birds, Bugs and Beasts” group show on 28 July, you’ll see it in an up close and personal way. Leave your arachnophobia at the door.        Read more

Eupatorus gracilicornis: Wilburn

The Five-horned Beetle is one of the most elegant of rhinoceros beetles. They are also known as Hercules beetles, unicorn beetles, or horn beetles. There are over 300 described species of these beetles, best known for their bizarre shapes and large size. Wilburn will be on display and for sale at the Oliver Center for the Arts July 28 – September 8, 2017 as part of a group exhibition, “Bugs, Birds and Beasts.” Cold assembly: vintage wood sock darner, antique drawer pulls,Read more

Panchlora nivea: Virgil

 The Cuban cockroach is found in the Caribbean and southern U.S. It lives outdoors, so is not considered a pest. In fact it is a popular pet roach due to its relatively pleasant green color, and because it is not an invasive indoor species. It is also used as food for other pets. Virgil is formidably tall–just over four feet–but manages to charm folks with his dry wit and delicate sensibilities. He will be on display and for sale at the Oliver CenterRead more

Archimantis latistyla: Brunneis

Brunneis is based on the large brown mantis, a species native to Australia. They are beneficial garden insects who prey on pests. Adults can jump about a meter and attack large prey, such as small birds, frogs, and lizards. While a praying mantis will bite if provoked, the bite is not venomous. Brunneis will be on display and for sale at the Oliver Center for the Arts July 28 – September 8, 2017 as part of a group exhibition, “Bugs, Birds andRead more